Meet the Artist and Special Showing
Saturday, October 28th From 10am to 5pm
Work On View From October 28th – November 30th

Stop in and see these engaging pieces and don’t miss the opportunity to meet the artist on October 28th.

ABOUT THE ARTIST

Peace. Beauty. Light.

Three aspects that Rebecca Zook consciously incorporates into her paintings. As a native Texan, she grew up with an appreciation of the unique beauty that Texas offers. Wandering the trails, playing in the creek near her childhood home and befriending every creature she encountered, Rebecca found a true love in nature. This connection is something that’s remained a part of her throughout her life and this love of the landscape and its inhabitants is expressed through each brushstroke.

“I’m drawn to Texas’ plentiful native grasses in particular. Watching the wind weave patterns through them and the gentle swaying provide me with a much needed calm. I stand among them and am reminded of the ocean. Great waves roll across the fields. Seed heads catch the sun and glow like breaking spray.”

The Texas sky also holds great fascination. She has photographed clouds for close to 12 years, amassing a huge collection of source material with the intent of creating a series of paintings. She finally began that ongoing project in late 2015.

“If you stop and watch the sky for any length of time, you realize how quickly it transforms itself. Clouds spring to life, change shape and dissipate right before your eyes. Sunrises and sunsets are the most dramatic. Almost second by second the colors grow and fade. My paintings capture one brief moment of that perpetually changing beauty.”

“The Natural World” is a body of work that is a true labor of love for the artist. Rebecca hopes you enjoy these paintings and her written thoughts that accompany each piece.

 

ABOUT THE PAINTINGS

Rebecca works primarily from her own photographs; never leaving the house without a camera. Although she has a professional-level digital Nikon, most of her cloud source material was shot with a small, and rather old, pocket-sized Cannon that has stood the test of time. Gessoed masonite boards that she prepares herself are Rebecca’s preferred painting surface. Her acrylic technique often involves many overlapping layers of thin washes of color. She finds this better conducive to capturing the unique qualities of light. You can follow Rebecca on Facebook to view the in progress photos of many of her paintings.

Painting info:

“Burn from Within”
Acrylic on Masonite | 36” x 24”
$2,850 unframed

Some people keep their emotions hidden. Their hopes, desires and needs pushed to the side to focus on others. There may be nobility in this, but the dreams do not die. They continue to burn from within. The beauty of their life’s potential still exists. If nourished, those buried dreams will begin to glow. They grow to fill a void spilling light upon the landscape touching everyone around them. There is still time. It’s never too late as long as an ember still shines.

“Whispers in the Wind”
acrylic on masonite | 12” x 12”
$449 unframed

Soft colors float gently through the sky. Tender thoughts whispered in the wind. There is only here and now. This moment of peace to calm the hurried mind.

Rebecca Zook - Whispers in the Wind

”Soul Searching”
Acrylic on Masonite | 12” x 12”
$449 unframed

With eyes as big as the moon, the Great Horned Owl sees into your soul, unmasking the hidden and bringing forth wisdom. He guides you to new heights on silent wings.

Everyone in the neighborhood knew my house when I was a kid. My Dad’s giant HAM radio tower couldn’t be missed. At Christmas, it was the house with the tower topped by a Great Horned Owl. I’m not positive what attracted him there at winter only, but we used to say, it was the Christmas lights. You could see them reflected in his eyes. He’d take flight and swoop low following our street, his wingspan seemingly spanning the width of the road. Completely silent in flight. I can’t think of a Great Horned Owl without this scene coming to mind.

“The Watcher”
Acrylic on Masonite | 12” x 12”
$449 unframed

A survivor, coyote is always watching. Loved and hated by man, he must be clever to find ways to survive in his changing world. Curiosity leads to opportunity. Opportunities he cannot afford to lose. Coyote is more though. He still finds joy in the face of adversity, dancing and singing in the moonlight.

If I have an animal totem, it would be the coyote; encountering them at sporadic points in my life that left me in awe. As a young child, we traveled from Texas to California with a travel trailer one summer, stopping at roadside attractions along the way. I remember being at the edge of the wild desert and feeling eyes on me. I turned to see a coyote. We stood facing each other, but I did not feel threatened. I was mesmerized. I turned back around to show my Dad, but the coyote had vanished leaving a lasting impression that is still vivid in my mind. As a teenager I was driving home late at night and spied a coyote following the railroad tracks in the the middle of suburbia. With no one around, I stopped the car. He stopped trotting and once again we were face-to-face, studying one another, until he slowly turned to continue down the lonely tracks finally fading from view. This time my awe was tinged with sadness thinking about his displacement from ancestral ranges by humans. There were additional solitary sightings, just me and him, over the years where I saw his swiftness, strength and sleek beauty. I had a coyote take up residence under our home one winter. I will forever see the coyote as a survivor. In a way, that is also how I see myself.

“Spring Blanket”
Acrylic on Masonite | 24” x 18”
$2,495 unframed

Commonly called “Blanket Flowers” (Gaillardia pulchella), these say Texas to me more than the bluebonnets. Though beautiful, bluebonnets are short-lived and a bit finicky; needing a certain level of rainfall to be at their best. Blanket flowers appear after the bluebonnets and revel in the blistering Texas summer sun. They represent the hardiness of true Texans to me as they cover the rolling hills forming a blanket across the land.